Viking Sword Accidentally Discovered by Hunters

Kamie Berry | September 8th, 2017

A rare, intact Viking sword was recently found in the mountains in Norway. Almost as interesting as the find itself, is the manner in which it was found.

Three reindeer hunters were out on a hunt in the mountains in Oppland, Norway when they found the sword stuck between some rocks, with the blade sticking out. After being analyzed, it has been determined that the ancient weapon is around 1200 years old and most likely belonged to a Viking swordsman.

ariseuniverse.com

The blade was quite rusty, but the fact that it survived at all means that it was probably constructed of very high-quality iron to begin with. It also probably once had a hilt made of bone, wood, leather, or some combination of the three. That part of the sword, however, did not survive since it was made of organic matter.

At first, some suspected that melting of the permafrost or stone movement might have caused the sword to reappear. After studying it, though, archaeologists believe that it was found exactly where it was first left. This is because it did not have any scratches or bending, as would normally occur if it had been buried for some time below the frost layer. The weapon was probably covered in snow most of the time, making it hard to find. The hunters just got lucky.

As of now, no one knows for sure why the sword was left there. There was no evidence of a burial nearby, so it is unlikely that it formed part of a burial treasure. A sword like this would also have been very expensive, so it is doubtful that it would have been carelessly left there by its owner and forgotten. It probably would have been the most valuable possession of its owner.

The most probable explanation is that the Viking who owned it died on the mountain, possibly from exposure, and probably alone. He could have become lost in a blizzard while traveling through the mountains, for example. Why he would have been traveling alone in such dangerous conditions is unknown. No human remains were found, and unless they are, it is probable that we will never know the full story of how the sword came to rest in the lonely Norwegian mountains.

Next Article
  • Famous Greek Philosopher Died From Eating Too Much Watermelon

    One famous philosopher and lecturer by the name of John Argyropoulos has an extremely rare cause of death. Made even more surprising when you learned he survived the sacking of Constantinople. Argyropoulos apparently died from consuming too much watermelon. Born in 1415, he was a Greek scholar who is reputed...

    Read More
  • You May Have Talked To Halle Berry Anonymously When You Had AOL

    One film star loves to have normal conversations with new people, unfortunately when you are a worldwide known celebrity this is not always possible. However, with online chat rooms readily available in this modern age, it is easy to go and talk to someone anonymously. Halle Berry was one of...

    Read More
  • Young Abraham Lincoln’s Deadly Sword Duel

    At a young age in 1842, Abraham Lincoln publicly berated by James Shields during a debate about banking in Illinois. The humiliation in public led to James Shields challenging Lincoln to a duel. This was a duel to the end, where the victor would take both the life and the pride of his opponent. [caption...

    Read More
  • Blue Java Bananas That Taste Just Like Vanilla Ice Cream

    When it comes to mother nature there is no barrier on it providing us with tasty delicious dessert flavored fruits, you don’t need to buy a tub of Ben and Jerry's every night. There is one banana that taste just like ice cream, in fact, it is nicknamed the ice cream banana. [caption id="attachment_4900" align="aligncenter"...

    Read More
  • George Washington And The Huge $15,000 Bar Tab

    If you think some of the modern day politicians commit indiscretions and fraudulent expense claims, well you may be surprised to hear some of the historical heroes were the same. In fact, it was well known that George Washington loved his whiskey. In the late 18th century, Washington was actually...

    Read More