This Simple Invention Seals Gunshot Wounds In Seconds

Gunshot wounds are hard to seal. Paramedics can only apply pressure on the gunshot wound and get the person to the hospital as quickly as possible. What if you could close up the wound in mere seconds and give the victim a greater chance of surviving?

Meet XStat, the medical device that can change emergency as well as battlefield medicine forever. Its concept is simple: the device uses a pressure applicator, and injects a cluster of small, briskly-expanding sponges into the wound fissure and rapidly seals it.

xStat
nbcnews.com

When injected into the wound, the sponges create adequate pressure to quickly slow the bleeding pace and let clotting occur. It has demonstrated statistically substantial results in swine testing and according to the manufacturers, it has helped by a significant reduction in blood loss, medic treatment time and resuscitation fluid requirement. Also, it’s very simple, and pretty much anybody can use it.

RevMedX, its creator, states that uninhibited bleeding is the primary cause of death during battles and the 2nd in causing of death of civilians who have suffered from trauma.

The report from National Center for Biotech Information states that from 2001-2009, the highest percentage of battlefield deaths came from trauma-hemorrhage, precisely what this device is meant to stop. In potentially survivable hemorrhage cases, the bleeding areas are the torso (48%), the extremity (31%), and the junctional regions (axilla, neck, and groin) (21%). These statistics are what caused the report to endorse new developments in bleeding sealing. The company believes that the product is the sole solution.

The researchers first tried using foam for the solution, but blood pressure was relatively high, and it just poured out the injected material. In the end, they settled for a sponge made from wood pulp which was also covered in chitosan, the anti-microbial coagulant gotten from shrimp shells.

This device is definitely a game-changer in survivable trauma. In the past, all medics responding to such wounds could do is just stuff gauze in the wound. Yes, it’s just as agonizing as it sounds as it needs to be done over and over if the bleeding refuses to cease within about three minutes.

This invention has recently been approved in the U.S. by the FDA. Soon, you’ll be able to store this lifesaving invention at home in your first-aid kit.

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