Santa Claus’ Grave May Have Been Found

If you have young children around, you may not want them to read this. They would likely be devastated to hear the news that the grave of the historical Santa Claus, whose real name was St. Nicholas of Myra, has probably been found.

For years, it was thought that the remains of St. Nicholas were buried somewhere in Italy. Legend said that his bones were stolen by Italian sailors and carried away sometime in the 11th century. No one could say where in Italy the bones were reburied, though. The discovery of a temple buried beneath the St. Nicholas Church in the Turkish province of Antalya has changed that assumption.

foxnews.com

The Turkish church is in the city of Demre, which was built on the ruins of the ancient city of Myra. This is where the historical St. Nicholas lived in the 4th century. It was here that the saint earned his reputation for giving gifts to poor people. Archaeologists have conducted scans of the previously unknown temple, and these tests indicate the presence of a tomb.

Proving the existence of the tomb may turn out to be tricky. To get to them, an intricate mosaic floor would have to be removed. This is painstaking process and requires special approval from the Turkish government. So far, government officials have been supportive of the plans to excavate the temple, but their efforts may be hampered by sceptics who think the scans only show areas of hollow earth beneath the church floor.

The discovery of these bones would be important because they would be considered relics, as are the remains of all saints. The Catholic Church has an interest in finding these bones because they would be an object of veneration by Catholics all over the world. The find could also give a boost to the Turkish tourism industry, which has suffered in the past year after the failed coup that was meant to oust President Erdogan.

It’s too early to say for certain that these are the bones of one of the world’s most famous saints. If any bones are found, they will undergo a series of tests, including DNA testing, to help determine their age and other characteristics.

For now, it’s safe to keep on believing that Santa Claus is alive and well in the North Pole.

Next Article
ADVERTISEMENT
  • What Happened to Bobby Dunbar?

    On August 23, 1912, the Dunbars, a wealthy family from Opelousas, Louisiana, went on a fishing trip to Swayze Lake, also in Louisiana. The small family group consisted of Percy and Lessie Dunbar and their two young children, Alonzo and Bobby. At some point that day, four-year-old Bobby went missing. Volunteers and police searched the...

    Read More
  • The Unlikely Witch of Edinburgh

    From late 17th-century Scotland comes one of the strangest stories of witchcraft to emerge out of that period. Most people who were convicted and executed for the crime of witchcraft had to have their confessions tortured or bullied out of them. But this person’s confession was totally voluntary and completely unexpected. Major Thomas Weir was...

    Read More
  • The First Vending Machine Was Invented 2000 Years Ago

    Vending machines are a part of everyday life for most people. They can be found just about everywhere, from offices to schools to rest stops on the side of the highway. With the vending machines of today dispensing everything from sodas to electronics, one could be forgiven for thinking they are purely a modern invention....

    Read More
  • Origins of Easter Island’s First Inhabitants Remains Mysterious

    Easter Island, also known as Rapa Nui, is one of the most mysterious places on earth. The tiny, isolated island, with a total area of only 64 square miles and over 1100 miles away from any other inhabited area, is perhaps best-known for its giant statues. These statues, known as moai, are themselves a mystery....

    Read More
  • The Mysterious Tunguska Event

    On the morning of June 30, 1908, a huge ball of fire was observed streaking across the sky in a remote part of Siberia, in Russia. No one knew what it was at the time, but whatever its origins, it exploded above the Podkamennaya Tunguska River, flattening nearly 800 square miles of forest. This strange...

    Read More
  • Testosterone and the Stock Market

    Most professional stock market traders in the United States today are young males. Aside from a glaring lack of diversity, this gender imbalance in the financial industry may also cause instability in the stock market itself. A new study published in the journal Management Science has shown a link between testosterone levels and rash decision...

    Read More
  • Stephen Colbert's Life Was Far More Interesting Than You Imagined

    Stephen Colbert is a man-made mystery. But it’s not your fault, or even his fault. It would be our fault if we didn’t bring it to your attention though. When you take a look at Colbert’s eventful life, it’s easy to see that he’s a real American hero. His story touches every emotion from heartbreaking...

    Read More
  • The Surgery With the 300% Mortality Rate

    For most of his medical career Robert Liston (born in 1794 in Scotland) was a well-regarded and competent surgeon. His surgical skills were phenomenal, with much lower mortality rates than most of his fellow physicians. The reason for Dr. Liston’s low mortality rate was his incredible speed when performing surgeries. Since there was no anesthesia...

    Read More