The Roots of Modern Day Skiing

wikimedia.org
wikimedia.org

While many people dread the beginning of winter, outdoor enthusiasts revel in the winter landscape. Skiing is a popular winter recreation activity for people around the world. But did you ever stop to think about when people begin incorporating skiing into their lifestyle?

Flash back to 6300 B.C.E. and envision the snowy, harsh terrain of Europe and Asia. The earliest archaeological evidence of skiing dates back to this time, and a wooden ski was discovered just north of Lake Sindor outside of Moscow, Russia. Our human ancestors began hunting the variety of fauna living in the European and Asian continents. Moving over snow-covered terrain can severely limit mobility, and our innovative ancestors developed skis to move swiftly and quietly through the landscape. At this point, skis were made to help move more efficiently and to make life easier. The skis varied by human location and population, revealing skis with varying sizes and shapes. It is unknown how widespread the use of skis were. Despite this unknown, it is fairly certain that using them improve mobility would have been valuable technology in any environment with deep snow.

The specific roots of skiing remain unclear. Valuable artifacts are all we have help build a story leading to present day. The oldest physical skis were found in Russia and the oldest description of skiing appears in a Chinese text tracing back to 205 and 225 B.C.E. Despite the muddled origins, modern skiing is often attributed to indigenous people of Scandinavia know as the Sami (also called Laplanders). The Sami people have a historical range across Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia. They are traditionally semi-nomadic and rely on reindeer herding, and of course, skiing across the arctic terrain. This technology was adopted by other cultures as a means of transportation, which eventually led to the sport and recreation skiing that we see most commonly today.

Next time you hop on your skis for an adrenaline rush, consider the long, mysterious history of skiing technology and human innovation.

Next Article
ADVERTISEMENT
  • The Myth of the Rat King

    haltonwildlife.ca

    If you are eating right now, you might want to save this article for later. Despite the cute picture and the cartoonish-sounding title, rat kings are not adorable pet rats in fancy dress. On the contrary, what we know of rat kings is the stuff of nightmares. A rat king is group of rats whose...

    Read More
  • That Mona Lisa Smile

    cocupo.com

    Thousands of tourists file past Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, the “Mona Lisa,” in the Louvre museum in Paris every day. Aside from the fact that this is a masterful artwork, people are also fascinated by the enigmatic facial expression on the face of the painting’s subject. Is she smiling? Or is she smirking or frowning?...

    Read More
  • The Strange Pets of Famous People in History

    adelaidezoo.com.au

    Many famous historical figures have had well-known animal companions. President Franklin Roosevelt’s dog Fala was so important to him that there is a statue of him at his Washington, D.C. memorial. Many of us know about the current Queen Elizabeth’s Corgis. The Roman Emperor Caligula loved his horse, Incitatus, so much that he may have...

    Read More
  • Rome’s Deadly Hitwoman

    assets.rbl.ms

    When we think of hitmen today, we usually imagine some shady character out of a Godfather movie, planting a bomb in a car or surprising his target in his home. But the role of hitman goes back much further than 20th century America. Politicians have been hiring assassins for thousands of years, and private citizens...

    Read More
  • The Great Molasses Flood of 1919

    cbsnews1.cbsistatic.com

    Just after noon on January 15, 1919, something went very wrong at the Purity Distilling Company in Boston’s North End. It was at that time that a storage tank, filled to the brim with 26 million pounds of molasses, ripped open. Before anyone could register what had happened, a 15-foot wave of sticky syrup was...

    Read More
SHARE
Previous articleHe Pulled Off The Greatest Heist In History And Then Vanished
Next articleThe Wallace Line: An Important Discovery That Nobody Knows About