The Monster of Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle, located in the town by the same name Scotland’s county of Angus, has long been associated with tales of the supernatural. Tales of ghosts, witches, and even the Devil himself are wrapped up in the history of this 15th century castle, which was once home to Queen Elizabeth II’s mother.

The Earls of Strathmore have called Glamis home since the 14th century, and it is one of their line who has inspired the castle’s most frightening story. It is said that the castle has a secret room that imprisons a beast, known as the Monster of Glamis.

upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org

On October 21, 1821, the wife of the future 12th Earl of Strathmore gave birth to a son. Records state that the boy was named Thomas, but that he died the same day he was born. Legends state that this child did not die, but that he was born so deformed that just looking at him could make someone go crazy.

If the legends are true, this poor child was locked away in a hidden room. No one thought he would live long, but he grew to manhood and became known as “the Monster.” The Earls themselves were the only family members to know of the secret, and they passed the knowledge down from father to son. Only one servant was allowed to know of his existence, and this servant was responsible for feeding him through a hole in the door to cell. He would also take the Monster on walks, but only on the darkest of nights, when the moon did not shed any light on the grounds of the estate. The battlements that he is said to have walked are still known as the “Mad Earl’s Walk” today.

Despite these intense efforts to keep the Monster’s existence a secret, it is said that a stonemason accidentally discovered the hidden room while performing maintenance work on the castle. This was considered such an emergency that the Earl was called back to Glamis by telegraph message. The Earl then supposedly paid off the mason, who subsequently emigrated to Australia.

Is this story true, or is it just a modern legend? There is no substantiated documentary evidence for Thomas’ existence beyond the day of his birth and supposed death, so he probably did die due to his deformities. The man responsible for writing about the legend and making it publicly known was well-known for his fictitious ghost stories, though he claimed to be a historian when he published the story of the Monster. Given the ability of castles and old houses to inspire ghost stories and legends, it would not be surprising to find out that the Monster of Glamis is nothing but another invented tale. Since everyone connected with the story’s origins is now dead, we may never know if such a tragic figure really existed.

Next Article
ADVERTISEMENT
  • The Plastic-Eating Caterpillar That Could Help Save the Planet

    assets2.bigthink.com

    An amateur Spanish beekeeper recently made a discovery that could have a major impact in our planet’s fight against pollution and global warming. While tending to her beehives, she removed some wax worms from them, since they are pests that are parasitic towards bee colonies. To get rid of them, she put them in an...

    Read More
  • The Cottingley Fairies

    i.kinja-img.com

    In the village of Cottingley, England, in the closing days of World War I, a nine-year-old girl got into trouble for playing in a stream and getting her clothes dirty. Her response, and that of her older cousin and accomplice, would be one of the most long-lasting hoaxes ever perpetrated on the world. Young Frances...

    Read More
  • Ancient “Hobbit” Species’ Origins Discovered

    thestar.com

    The hominid species Homo floresiensis were a small race of human-like creatures that lived on some Indonesian islands beginning at least 100,000 years ago. Because of their small stature- they were only about three feet tall and weighed around 50 pounds- they have been dubbed “hobbits,” after the small, hairy people in The Lord of...

    Read More
  • The Mysterious Life and Death of Kaspar Hauser

    4.bp.blogspot.com

    On May 26, 1828, an unknown teenage boy appeared on the streets of Nuremberg, Germany. Georg Weickmann, a local shoemaker, was the first to register the boy’s strange appearance, as he was dressed in shabby clothing and was tottering around as though he was drunk. When Weickmann approached the teenager, he was handed a letter...

    Read More
  • The Mysterious Death of Meriwether Lewis

    tnvacation.com

    Most people in the United States have heard of Meriwether Lewis, one half of the famed Lewis and Clark Expedition that claimed the Pacific Northwest for the U.S. and explored the newly purchased Louisiana Territory. Lewis was an extraordinary person by most accounts. During his life, he was a successful soldier and presidential aide. He...

    Read More
SHARE
Previous articleThe Surprising Origins of Our Easter Traditions
Next articleLost Tombs of Archbishops Discovered Under London Museum Floor