These Historical Photos of New York City Are Breathtaking

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In the early 1900s the New York Public Library opened their flagship ‘Main Branch’ in the heart of New York City. Shortly after, an initiative was launched to document the city’s rapidly changing landscape.

Thankfully over 50,000 breathtaking photographs were collected spanning several decades, and were recently made digitally available. This is a collection of some of the most iconic locations, as well as photos from other sources that were too good to leave out.

1. George Washington Bridge

George Washington Bridge in 1930s
New York Public Library

The George Washington Bridge’s upper level opened to traffic in October 1931 while its lower level wasn’t opened until a staggering 31 years later in August 1962. The bridge’s tower stands an incredible 604 feet above the water, making it an architectural marvel still to this day.

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