Global Warming Terrified People As Early As 1874

Global Warming
Global Warming has obviously been a prominent and contentious issue in recent years. The advancement of science and the ability to accurately track data has led many of the top environmental scientists to conclude that the planet is undoubtedly warming at a increasingly rapid pace, and that it is largely due to our actions.

It may seem like mankind’s role in climate change is a relatively new fear, but there are examples of the topic in media as early as 1874. That year, the Kansas City Times printed a letter by an alleged scientist in Italy claiming that a discovery made by astronomer Giovanni Donati outlines our impending doom. According to the so-called discovery, the planet started moving closer to the sun after the transatlantic telegraph cable was laid across the ocean floor. Donati went on to suggest that the cables were acting as giant electromagnets that attract the Earth to the sun, so much so that the planet would collide into the sun within decades. Legend has it that Donati died soon after due to consternation regarding the discovery.

It is not known whether people or the newspapers actually took the claim seriously, though the story was reprinted in countless publications.

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