Does This Diamond Carry a Curse?

Do you believe in curses? One of the most well known tales of a curse is based on the deadly track record of a valuable gem: the Hope Diamond.  The Hope Diamond is a valuable stone, weighing about 45 carats and estimated to be worth a quarter of a billion dollars. The walnut-sized jewel sparkles with a rare and rich blue color cause by the presence of boron atoms. It is famous for is rare beauty, scientific insight into our knowledge of diamonds, incredible size and controversial history of brining bad luck to those who own it.

Wikimedia
Wikimedia

The Hope Diamond was likely found and harvested in India. It is rumored that a Hindu priest sold the diamond for a profit, only to be rewarded for his thievery by being sentenced to death. In 1666, a French gem merchant named Jean-Baptiste Tavernier purchased the blue jewel, naming it the Tavernier Blue (after himself, of course)! The French King Louis XIV noticed its beauty and he purchased the blue jewel a few years after its discovery- seemingly great news to a now very rich Tavernier! Tavernier’s fortune did not last long- he met his end by being mauled to death by a pack of dogs. It remained in the King’s collection for over 100 years, being recut by predecessors, until it was stolen during the French Revolution and in 1791. The travels and owners of the diamond remained murky until 1812, when it reappeared in London. The gem was acquired by the Hope family, which subsequently gave the diamond its new name. Since then, the diamond has had multiple owners in the United Kingdom and eventually migrated to the United States.

Many owners of the diamond grew ill, died in unconventional ways, lost money or family members and even became suicidal. The Hope Diamond was rumored to not just lead its owner to one misfortune, but many unpleasant possibilities.  Jeweler Harry Winston, the final official owner of the diamond, helped break the curse by donating, not selling, it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1958. You are able to observe the stone, if you dare to, at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C.

 

Next Article
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Before 1935 Toilet Paper Had Splinters

    Yes, your nightmare, toilet paper with splinters, was actually a sold commodity before the 1930s. Imagine going to the toilet, only to have to face a dangerous roll of toilet paper that was planning to stab you the moment you let your guard down. Those splinters would have been extremely painful, that is for sure....

    Read More
  • Melanism Nature’s Incredible Opposite Of Albinism

    Most people have heard of Albinism which is the congenital disorder that is known by the complete or partial absence of any skin pigments. The pigments are often lacking in the skin, hair, and eyes. Normally this results in white hair and pink eyes when it comes to mammals. When it comes to animals it...

    Read More
  • Wolverine Horror Frog Breaks It Own Bones For A Claw

    The hairy frog or the horror frog as eloquently known is not only a strange looking creature in the animal kingdom. It also possesses a trait which as far as everyone knows is completely unique. When under aggression or needing to defend itself from a predator, the hairy frog will break its own toe to...

    Read More
  • So Many People Were Buried Alive A Safety Coffin Was Patented

    During the 17th and 18th century one of the great fears that played in the back of everyone’s mind was the possibility of being buried alive. With sicknesses and diseases often ravaging whole communities, sometimes mistakes were made. It could only take someone falling into a deep fever, with their breathing extremely lowered for them...

    Read More
  • The Mouse That Believes It's A Wolf

    If you heard this creature deafening cry during the night, you may be mistaken to think a wolf was right behind you. Definitely, you would not want to hear it creep up behind you howling in a forest, though if it did you may be forgiven for breaking down into nervous laughter. Because this is...

    Read More