14,000-Year-Old Village Unearthed in Canada

An ancient village, estimated to be about 14,000 years old, has been discovered in Canada. It was found on the remote island of Triquet, which is located about 300 miles northwest of Victoria. If the unearthed settlement is as old as believed, that would make it the one of oldest known human settlements yet discovered in the Americas. It would be three times older than the Great Pyramids of Giza in Egypt and eve older than ancient Rome.

The University of Victoria’s Hakai Institute has been supporting the excavation work, and they have found a treasure trove of artifacts at the village site. Archaeologists have unearthed Ice Age hunting tools, including spears and fish hooks, as well as an ancient hand drill used for lighting fires and a set of stone tools. They were able to date the site by testing charcoal that was found in a hearth buried eight feet underground.

ancient-origins.net
ancient-origins.net

This discovery provides support for the oral history of the Heiltsuk Nation, one of Canada’s First Nations. According to these traditions, their ancestors set up coastal villages 13,000 or more years ago. Throughout the generations, the Heiltsuk people have passed down stories about their people moving across a land bridge that once connected what is now Siberia and Alaska. Scientists have long doubted that these tales could be true, believing that this route would not have provided enough in the way of natural resources for these first settlers to cross over. They have also long thought that these coastal areas could not have supported human habitation. Instead, they have theorized that the first migrants to North America reached the continent via the boats that landed much further down the coast, where there were more natural resources. The discovery of this settlement could eventually help the Heiltsuk in their negotiations with Canada’s government over title rights to their ancestral lands.

Finds at the site confirm other oral histories of the Heiltsuk people. For example, their stories talk about a time when their people switched from eating large sea mammals, like seals, to a diet consisting of finfish. The discovery of fish hooks at the site confirms these histories. This shows how traditional stories, passed down from one generation to the next, may be valuable for more than their cultural value; they may be more useful than once thought for scientific research.

Next Article
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Missing Couple Found Frozen After 75 Years

    On August 15, 1942 Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin, a Swiss married couple who were also parents to seven children, walked up to a mountain pasture near Chandolin, Switzerland to feed their cows. This was a rare excursion for the couple to take together, since Francine was often pregnant and could not usually make the climb....

    Read More
  • 27 Contact Lenses Found Lodged in One Woman’s Eye

    The biggest nightmare for wearers of contact lenses came true for one British woman late last year. The 67-year-old went in for cataract surgery at Solihull Hospital in England last November. In addition to the cataracts, she also complained of pain in her right eye, which she assumed was caused by dry eyes or old...

    Read More
  • Was Jane Austen Poisoned?

    In July of 1817, popular novelist Jane Austen died. This writer of such perennial favorites as Pride and Prejudice and Emma was only 41, and she did not have a history of health problems. As medical science was not very advanced in the 1800s, no one knows what killed her, though Addison’s disease and lymphoma...

    Read More
  • The Man Who Tried to Raise the Perfect Wife

    Finding a wife was difficult in the 18th century. There was no online dating, and strict social controls made it difficult for members of the opposite sex to get to know one another. But things were especially hard for a man named Thomas Day, and he came up with a novel, though cruel, way to...

    Read More
  • Giant Iceberg Breaks Free in Antarctica

    Sometime between July 10th and July 12th, a giant iceberg broke free from Antarctica, wreaking havoc on shipping lanes in the area while it breaks up into smaller pieces. It broke off from the Larsen C Ice Shelf, automatically reducing that shelf’s area by 12% when it did so. Larsen C is now at its...

    Read More
  • The Worst Husband in British History

    By all accounts, Mary Eleanor Bowes should have had a happy life. She was born into one of the wealthiest families in England, as her father was the wealthy mine owner George Bowes. She was an only child, and she was much cherished by her parents. However, when her father unexpectedly died in 1760 when...

    Read More
  • The Papin Sisters and France’s Most Gruesome Murder Case

    Life seemed to be against the Papin sisters, Christine and Lea, from the time of their births, in 1905 and 1911 respectively. They were born into a highly dysfunctional family. Their mother reportedly had affairs, and their father was an abusive alcoholic. Their mother never showed them any affection, and was so mentally unstable that...

    Read More
  • The Legend of Spring-Heeled Jack

    Despite the many advances in science and industry that took place in Victorian England, that time period was till full of superstition and paranormal belief. Many people still believed in fairies, phrenology and spiritualism- all things that have since been proven false. Quite a few people also believed in a devil-man called Spring-Heeled Jack. The...

    Read More